Apple Spice Turkey Brine

Apple Spice Turkey Brine

Apple Spice Turkey Brine is one of my favorite brines for a turkey. This brine gives the bird a nice savory flavor that will put a smile on anyone’s face. For people who are new to the brining process the turkey absorbs the moisture , which in turn helps it stay juicy. The turkey absorbs salt too, it also gets nicely seasoned.

The salt also has one other benefit, it breaks down some of the turkey’s proteins, making it more tender. And the apple/ orange juice plus the brow n sugar adds an amazing flavor. Turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the breast meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough. If you want to avoid a dry bird for thanksgiving then you might need a little help. So try this brine recipe and enjoy the fruits of your labor.

Apple Spice Turkey Brine

Apple Spice Turkey Brine

Apple Spice Turkey Brine is one of my favorite brines for a turkey. This brine gives the bird a nice savory flavor that will put a smile on anyone's face.
Total Time 12 hrs
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 3 quarts apple juice
  • 2 quarts orange juice
  • 1 cup table salt
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 10 whole cloves whole
  • 1 tablespoon ground Allspice
  • 1 gallon cold water

Instructions
 

  • In a stockpot over medium heat, simmer apple juice, orange juice, brown sugar and the rest of the dry ingredients in the water until the salt and sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • Submerge the turkey in the brine, top with a plate, and put a large can or a few cans on the plate to hold the turkey under the brine.
  • Refrigerate the turkey in the brine for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Before roasting, remove the turkey from the brine, rinse it off under cold water so it’s not too salty, and pat it dry with paper towels.
  • Follow your favorite recipe and roast without using additional salt.

Video

Keyword brine, turkey
Savory Turkey Brine

Savory Turkey Brine

Savory Turkey Brine

For thanks giving everyone wants a nice Savory Turkey. Everyone knows turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the white meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough. If you want to avoid a dry, stuffy bird for thanksgiving then you might need a little help of a good Savory Turkey brine. At its simplest form a brine is a basic solution of water and salt. This Savory Turkey Brine adds something a little specials.

By giving a turkey a nice soak in this solution, you can actually add a bit more moisture and flavor into the bird before it’s ready to roast. Brining takes a little planning so be prepared to wet-brine for just 12 hours and you will have a better chance of staying juicy even if you overcook the turkey a little.

Savory Turkey Brine

Savory Turkey Brine

For thanks giving everyone wants a nice Savory Turkey. Everyone knows turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the white meat.
Total Time 12 hrs
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 2 quarts vegetable stock
  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons garlic diced
  • 1 tablespoon dried rosemary
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  • 2 quarts cold water

Instructions
 

  • In a stockpot over medium heat, simmer vegetable stock, white sugar and the rest of the dry ingredients in the water until the salt and sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • Submerge the turkey in the brine, top with a plate, and put a large can or a few cans on the plate to hold the turkey under the brine.
  • Refrigerate the turkey in the brine for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Before roasting, remove the turkey from the brine, rinse it off under cold water so it’s not too salty, and pat it dry with paper towels.
  • Follow your favorite recipe and roast without using additional salt.

Video

Keyword brine, turkey
Classic-Turkey-Brine

Classic Turkey Brine

If you are looking for a traditional thanksgiving turkey than this is the brine for you. Turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the breast meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough. If you want to avoid a dry bird for thanksgiving then you might need a little help. This Classic Turkey Brine is perfect recipe to keep your bird moist and juicy. At its simplest form a brine is a basic solution of water and salt. By giving a turkey a nice soak in this solution, you can actually add a bit more moisture and flavor into the bird before it’s ready to roast. During the brining process, the turkey absorbs the moisture, which in turn helps it stay juicy. The turkey absorbs salt too, it also gets nicely seasoned. The salt also has one other benefit, it breaks down some of the turkey’s proteins, making it more tender.

Classic-Turkey-Brine

Classic Turkey Brine:

If you are looking for a traditional thanksgiving turkey than this is the brine for you. Turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the breast meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough.
Total Time 12 hrs
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 2 gallons water cold
  • 2 1/2 cups kosher ​salt
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 teaspoons garlic diced
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon dried
  • 1 teaspoon allspice berries cracked
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions
 

  • In a stockpot over medium heat, simmer granulated sugar, kosher ​salt and the rest of the dry ingredients in the water until the salt and sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • Submerge the turkey in the brine, top with a plate, and put a large can or a few cans on the plate to hold the turkey under the brine.
  • Refrigerate the turkey in the brine for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Before roasting, remove the turkey from the brine, rinse it off under cold water so it’s not too salty, and pat it dry with paper towels.
  • Follow your favorite recipe and roast without using additional salt.
Keyword brine, turkey
maple and brown sugar brine

Brown Sugar and Maple Turkey Brine

Turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the breast meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough. If you want to avoid a dry bird for thanksgiving then you might need a little help. This is where brining comes in. At its simplest form a brine is a basic solution of water and salt.

By giving a turkey a nice soak in this solution, you can actually add a bit more moisture and flavor into the bird before it’s ready to roast. This Maple and brown sugar turkey brine will give your bird a nice sweet and savory flavor.

maple and brown sugar brine

Brown Sugar and Maple Turkey Brine

This Maple and brown sugar turkey brine will give your bird a nice sweet and savory flavor.
Total Time 12 hrs
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 3 quarts/3.8 liters water
  • 1 quarts of apple juice
  • 2 cups/475 ml brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups/360 ml maple syrup
  • 3/4 cup/180 ml Kosher salt
  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • 5 to 6 whole cloves garlic peeled
  • 8 whole bay leaves
  • 4 large sprigs thyme
  • 2 teaspoons whole peppercorns

Instructions
 

  • In a stockpot over medium heat, simmer apple juice, brown sugar, maple syrup and dry ingredients in the water until the salt and sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • Submerge the turkey in the brine, top with a plate, and put a large can or a few cans on the plate to hold the turkey under the brine.
  • Refrigerate the turkey in the brine for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Before roasting, remove the turkey from the brine, rinse it off under cold water so it’s not too salty, and pat it dry with paper towels.
  • Follow your favorite recipe and roast without using additional salt.

Video

Keyword brine, turkey
turkey brine

Six amazing turkey brining recipes

Why Brine Your Turkey? Turkey is a bird that has little fat, particularly the breast meat. And we all know fat keeps the meat from becoming dry and tough. If you want to avoid a dry bird for thanksgiving than you might need a little help.

This is where brining comes in. At its simplest form a brine is a basic solution of water and salt. By giving a turkey a nice soak in this solution, you can actually add a bit more moisture and flavor into the bird before it’s ready to roast.

During the brining process, the turkey absorbs the moisture, which in turn helps it stay juicy. The turkey absorbs salt too, it also gets nicely seasoned. The salt also has one other benefit, it breaks down some of the turkey’s proteins, making it more tender.

A bird that has been wet-brined for just 12 hours will have a better chance of staying juicy even if you overcook the turkey a little.

Six amazing turkey brining

Thanksgiving side dishes

Must have Thanksgiving sides

Thanksgiving sides: From potatoes to stuffing, veggies to salads, these are the staples of Thanksgiving. If you are anything like me, you’re already planning ahead, hoping to make the week leading up to Thanksgiving easy!

Thanksgiving side dishes

We’ve scoured the web, social media and found a couple of amazing side dish recipes every thanksgiving table should have. 

Candied Yams

There is nothing better than good baked candied yams, soul food style! There is nothing healthy about this soul food version baked candied yams but it’s thanksgiving so who cares. These candied yams are so buttery, sweet and flavorful. They will melt in your mouth!

Cranberry Sauce

https://sugarspunrun.com/homemade-cranberry-sauce/

A simple recipe for fresh and easy cranberry sauce. If you want to do a little more than the canned ocean spray cranberry sauce then this is the recipe for you. This cranberry sauce is a holiday classic and deserves a place on your table.  Made with real whole cranberries and only a couple of other ingredients. 

Macaroni and Cheese

https://www.momontimeout.com/best-homemade-baked-mac-and-cheese-recipe/

Homemade Mac and Cheese can be something very special. Outrageously cheesy, and creamy, and topped with a crunchy Panko-Parmesan topping and you have the perfect mac and cheese. This recipe is choked  of three different cheeses plus a homemade cheese sauce that makes this macaroni and cheese uber special.

Stuffing

https://cafedelites.com/sausage-herb-stuffing-recipe/

Every Thanksgiving needs a good stuffing recipe. It should be soft and buttery on the inside with crispy, golden edges on the outside. Inside it is full of onions, celery, garlic and herbs sautéed in butter. Bread and baked with a flavoured chicken or beef stock. And that is the perfect thanksgiving turkey stuffing.

Mashed Potatoes

https://www.southernliving.com/recipes/perfect-mashed-potatoes

Homemade creamy mashed potatoes is a Thanksgiving must. This amazing recipe is definitely worth a place on the Thanksgiving table. Topped with rich smooth Turkey Gravy, these mashed potatoes make the perfect side dish for a heavenly thanksgiving.

Homemade Gravy

https://www.thekitchn.com/breakfast-recipe-southern-sausage-gravy-recipes-from-the-kitchn-174453

Gravy every Thanksgiving table needs to be complete. This Sausage gravy is is so simple anyone can make. This recipe helps make the typical gravy  bigger, bolder, and more tasty.

Southern Greens

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/bacon-collard-greens/

The Collard Green is the traditional side dish of the American South. The best way is to cook it low and slow. Garlic, onions and bacon to make it nice and tender full of flavor. Collard Greens can feel like an intimidating side, but if you just follow this simple recipe anyone can make it.

Copy of Saffron

Saffron – The $1000 Exotic Spice

Lovers of the Spanish dish paella know that saffron is a key ingredient in this delectable dish.

saffron

First cultivated in Greece, the spice saffron originates from the Saffron Crocus flower.

Its bitter taste and hay-like fragrance contains the carotenoid dye, crocin, that gives food a rich golden-yellow hue.

The saffron crocus thrives in Mediterrean like climates, growing best in strong direct sunlight.

Saffron

The harvest window for saffron can be very short – lasting anywhere from 2 to 29 days a year, depending on the climate of the growth region.

Like many other ancient spices, saffron was also used as a medicinal, treating approximately 90 illnesses. 

As a powerful antioxidant, saffron research is on-going today. On the influence of its medicinal properties on such illnesses as cancer, MS, and Alzheimers.

A Little About Saffron’s Past

An exotic spice, saffron has a long ancient multicultural history dating back to the Stone Age. 

Over the course of time, the value of saffron cooking and medicinal properties spread throughout the Mediterranean, moving slowly into Eurasia, North African and North America.

Saffron cultivation was introduced to Spain, France and Italy by the Moorish civilization.

Saffron

And the Europeans eventually brought saffron to the Americas. 

Once in America, the Pennsylvania Dutch became the prime curators of the saffron spice.

Its medicinal qualities and subsequent trading history, like so many other rare spices. This accounts for the popularity of saffron reaching pricing levels analogous to that of the price of gold.

Saffron

Today, saffron’s unusual taste and food coloring properties contribute to its wide and diverse use in Arab, Central Asian, European, Indian, Iranian, Moroccan and Cornish cuisines including sweets and liquors.

In India and China, saffron is also used as a fabric dye.

The Price of Saffron

Saffron whole and retail prices can range from US $500/pound to US $5,000/pound. 

In Western countries, the average retail price is $1,000/pound. 

Saffron

And between 70,000 and 200,000 saffron threads comprise a pound!

As expected, saffron cultivators grow a variety of threads ranging in flavors. From Spain’s mellow, Italy’s robust, to the intense quality grown in Macedonian Greek, Iranian, and Kashmiri Indian regions.

Currently, the U.S. bans saffron from Iran and India bans the export of saffron from Kashmir, both highly desired and, clearly, hard to get.

So, all you paella lovers can order 2 grams (.07oz) of Spanish saffron on Amazon at $11.95 ($169.50 / Ounce). 

Now you can really appreciate what makes paella so irresistible!

Copy of Spam

The Wonderfulness of Spam: 5 Fun Facts

Although I only eat it about once or twice a year, I love Spam.  Why, you may wonder? Processed meat is a no-no on most healthy food lists.  And my particular dietary needs dictate minimizing processed foods.

However, when I do have my favorite pumpernickel, mayonnaise and Spam sandwich, it engenders such comfort and satisfaction!

Brings back warm childhood memories, when Spam and government cheese was all our family could afford at the time.

5 Fun Facts about spam

Developed in 1937 by the Hormel Corporation in Austin Minnesota, Spamtown, USA.

Consists of processed pork shoulder, water, salt, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrate.

An absolute favorite in the Hawaiian Islands, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines.

Annual Spam Festival, SpamJam, eld in Waikiki, Oahu and Spam Museum in  Austin, Minnesota.

Spam flavors:  Regular, Black Pepper, Jalapeño, Chorizo, Teriyaki, with Bacon, Hickory Smoke, and Hot & Spicy, with Tabasco sauce.

Spam
side dish

Best Thanksgiving sides dish’s

From potatoes to stuffing, veggies to salads, these are the staples of Thanksgiving. If you are anything like me, you’re already planning ahead, hoping to make the week leading up to Thanksgiving easy! We’ve scoured the web, social media and found a couple of amazing side dish recipes every thanksgiving table should have.

Candied Yams

There is nothing better than good old fashioned baked candied yams, soul food style! There is nothing healthy about this soul food version baked candied yams These candied yams are so buttery, sweet and tender. They practically melt in your mouth!

Cranberry Sauce

A simple recipe for fresh and easy homemade cranberry sauce. You can’t really ask for more. This cranberry sauce is a holiday classic and deserves a place on your table.  Made with real whole cranberries and only a couple of other ingredients. Make sure to check out the how-to video at the bottom of the post if you’re more of a visual learner!

View Recipe: https://sugarspunrun.com/homemade-cranberry-sauce

Macaroni and Cheese

Homemade Mac and Cheese can be something very special. Outrageously cheesy, amazingly creamy, and topped with a crunchy Panko-Parmesan topping and you have the perfect mac and cheese. There are three different cheeses and an original homemade cheese sauce that makes this macaroni and cheese next level.

View Recipe: https://www.momontimeout.com/best-homemade-baked-mac-and-cheese-recipe/

Stuffing

Every Thanksgiving needs a good stuffing recipe. Soft and buttery on the inside with crispy, golden edges and incredible flavours. To top it all off onions, celery, garlic and herbs are sautéed in butter, tossed with bread and baked with a flavoured stock. And you have the perfect thanksgiving turkey stuffing.

View Recipe: www.cafedelites.com/sausage-herb-stuffing-recipe/

Mashed Potatoes

No Traditional American holiday spread is complete without homemade creamy mashed potatoes. This amazing recipe is definitely worth celebrating. Topped with rich smooth Turkey Gravy, these mashed potatoes make the perfect side dish for any thanksgiving table.

View Recipe: https://www.southernliving.com/recipes/perfect-mashed-potatoes

Homemade Gravy

To finish off any good thanksgiving table you need your self a good gravy. This Sausage gravy is one of those dishes that is so simple, anyone can pull this off. This recipe helps make the typical gravy  bigger, bolder, and more unique.

View Recipe: https://www.thekitchn.com/breakfast-recipe-southern-sausage-gravy-recipes-from-the-kitchn-174453

Southern Greens

The Collard Green is the traditional side dish of the American South cooked low and slow with a little garlic, onions and bacon to make it nice and tender. Collard Greens can feel like an intimidating dish, but if you follow these recipes anyone can make it. The hardest part about the recipe is waiting for the delicious end result.

caviar

Has Caviar Lost Some of Its Royal Luster?

Caviar

Once reserved strictly for the pleasure of royalty, caviar is now accessible to anyone who enjoys eating fish eggs.

Yup, that’s what the regal sounding word caviar means – fish eggs. In other words, salt-cured roe extracted primarily from fish sources such as sturgeon, salmon, white fish, to name a few.

Caviar

History of Caviar

Caviar’s birthplace originated in the belly of the sturgeon fish. The sturgeon fish, itself, has a long ancient history dating back some 250 million years. 

The word ‘caviar’ first appeared in print in 1591. Eventually, caviar became a delicacy for Middle Eastern and Eastern European diets, in particular Russia.

The first caviar plant was founded in the 14th century in Russia by a lake full of sturgeon. Until the early 1900’s, Russia and Iran were the primary producers of high quality/high priced sturgeon caviar. 

Once abundant in the rivers and neighboring seas of Russia and Iran, the overfishing of sturgeon in those countries began to limit the availability of sturgeon roe. 

Caviar in the US

Enter the U.S.A. and caviar production. Established in 1873 by a German immigrant, American sturgeon caviar was eventually distributed throughout the world.

A 1900 Pennsylvania report estimated that 90% of Russian caviar was produced by the U.S.

Yes, you read that right – at one point, the majority of Russian caviar was produced in and internationally distributed by the U.S. and then re-imported back into the U.S. as Russian caviar!

Caviar

The end of Sturgeon Caviar

Eventually, the depletion of sturgeon resources became a worldwide issue for the producers of caviar. And, as a result, by the 1960’s, caviar prices had skyrocketed, requiring other Caviar producing countries to search for new sources of roe like salmon, white fish, and lumpfish.

The replacements were not the same caliber as sturgeon roe, the primary source of the infamous Beluga caviar, but served as adequate substitutes.

For the caviar lover, sturgeon is the premier source of high quality caviar although other roe delicacies are gaining popularity.

Caviar

True enjoyment of diverse food delicacies such as caviar often requires having an acquired taste for said delicacy. Caviar is graded on the basis of size, texture, and flavor of the eggs.

Two main grades dominate the caviar market:

Grade 1: Firm, large eggs that are intact (more expensive).

Grade 2: Less delicate and less perfectly formed eggs (less expensive).taste.  

Caviar

So, for you lovers of caviar who cannot necessarily afford the very best, the availability and quality of alternative sources are proving to be a more than adequate reminder of the “black gold” once treasured by the royalty of Europe.

Caviar

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Turducken

Why Did John Madden Love The Turducken…The What?

Immortalized by the former, critically acclaimed NFL sportscaster, John Madden. And popularized by the infamous New Orleans chef Paul Prudhomme, the turducken is a poultry lovers’ holiday trifecta. A deboned chicken stuffed into a deboned duck stuffed into a deboned turkey.

Madden was so enthralled with the turducken that he would award one to the players of the winning team during the Thanksgiving Day telecast.

Turducken

Prudhomme trademarked the name in 1986. Making it one of his specialty dishes he served at his nationally renowned Cajun and Creole restaurant-KPaul’s Louisiana Kitchen.

From a technical standpoint, engastration is the term used for this unique cooking process, stuffing one animal inside another.

The origins of the turducken

The origins of the turducken in the U.S., however, are still a mystery. Many speculate that the specialty meat stores of South Louisiana were the brains behind its development.

Turducken

However, across the pond in Great Britain, the turducken cooking process has a historical lineage dating back to Romans.

The Brits classify their turducken as a type of ballotine, a 3 bird roast reminiscent of the Yorkshire Christmas Pie. A five bird roast consisting of a goose, a turkey, a chicken, a pheasant, and a pigeon, stuffed with sausage

Just imagine the culinary opportunities available to you in preparing a turducken for a special occasion.

The options are endless – stuffed, not stuffed, braised, roasted, deep fried. And/or barbecued, the diversity of seasonings– the consummate poultry dish.

Turducken

Obviously, a turducken preparation takes imagination, skill, and, most of all, patience and attention to detail.

With the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays on the horizon. Preparing a turducken would, no doubt, be the hit of the family dinner.

If the thought of preparing a turducken stimulates your adventurous spirit. And challenges your culinary instincts, then try this intriguing Taste of Home recipe.

To avoid being overwhelmed, make it a family affair.  Assign turducken duties and responsibilities.

As a matter of fact, delegate out to your dinner guests. Various aspects of the entire dinner such as sides, salads, and desserts. 

Do this so you and your team can concentrate on preparing the best turducken ever…

Happy Turducken!

Thanksgiving

Ever Thought About The First Thanksgiving?

Ever thought about what the first Thanksgiving was like while reflecting upon your own family holiday memories? Curious about the who, what, where, how and when?

Well, legend has it that the first Thanksgiving took place in 1621, in Plymouth Massachusetts. 

Having first landed in 1620, the English colonists, aka the Pilgrims, experienced a very brutal New England winter. With most suffering and dying from illness and malnutrition. 

However, with the substantial help of the Wampanoag Native Americans. The Pilgrims that survived learned how to grow corn, extract sap from maple trees. Catch fish and shellfish, and avoid poisonous vegetation. 

Both groups came together for 3 days, celebrating the survival of the Pilgrims. Along with the bounty of the autumn harvest, thanks to the agricultural skills of the Wampanoag Native Americans.

One might say that the English colonists (Pilgrims) were the first “immigrant” arrivals to the “New World”.  

However, historical evidence documents the arrival of earlier English immigrant settlers on Roanoke Island, North Carolina in 1587. In 1606 at Popham, Maine, and 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia.

In any case, the 1621 Thanksgiving bounty. It’s reported, included venison, fish, geese, ducks, turkeys, corn, root vegetables, cranberries, stews and, of course, beer.

Believe it or not, it wasn’t until 1863, that Thanksgiving became an official national holiday.  

In the midst of a civil war and for obvious reasons, President Abraham Lincoln authorized a proclamation. Declaring the fourth Thursday in November as a day of national thanksgiving and prayer.

So, with the advent of Fall, as the Thanksgiving aromas begin to tease the senses. Memories of joyous family celebrations begin to pulsate in the heads of many Americans.

Aromas genuinely engineer memories, particularly around holiday time.

What makes thanksgiving amazing

Imagine cinnamon, nutmeg, rosemary, thyme, allspice and sage as the principal aromatic players in the preparation of any delectable Thanksgiving extravaganza. 

And on tables across America, the supporting caste includes sugar, butter, oil, root vegetables, perhaps a string bean casserole, and a sinfully delicious macaroni and cheese.

All your food items not typically listed on your healthy eating lists…but, at this time of year, who cares!

And, oh my goodness, we mustn’t forget about dessert. 

Just think about the variety, pumpkin, sweet potato, and traditional apple pies along with apple spice cake, pumpkin bread, and banana pudding.  

Dancing in my head are visions of apple dumpling, blueberry and/or peach cobbler, not to mention a host of ethnic goodies, depending on your family heritage, tantalizing your mental taste buds as well.

And the list goes on…

Of course, those family memories often include the loquacious antics of our “Uncle Charlies”, “Aunt Mabels”, “Cousin Stuart”, and “Neighbor Bob” who usually fire up some, if not all, at the Thanksgiving dinner tables.

Thanksgiving is definitely a family affair, always prepared with loving intent, anxiety-ridden at times, but, for the most part, a dedicated family gathering of relatives, friends, and neighbors.

Yup, in the final analysis, Thanksgiving is one of those annual holidays that represents our paying grateful homage to good food, good people, and memorable family moments.

Have a great Holiday!