How To Make A Martini


Professional bartenders like to say, “A Martini is not a cocktail, it’s a conversation.” Most Martini drinkers know exactly how they like their drink made; anything else just isn’t right. A classic Martini is made with gin, though some people prefer vodka. The next ingredient is dry vermouth, and the proper amount is often debated. In the early twentieth century, 2:1 gin to vermouth was the norm, but that has steadily decreased over the years and some people don’t want vermouth at all. This recipe uses a 4:1 ratio, and you can feel free to adjust to taste.


EQUIPMENT

Ingredients

  • 2 drops Orange Bitters
  • 1/2 ounce Dry Vermouth
  • 2 1/2 ounce Gin
  • Olives

INSTRUCTIONS 

  1. Put the bitters (if using), vermouth, and gin in a mixing glass with ice. Stir until very cold, about 15 seconds.
  2. Strain into the chilled glass. If using olives, put them on a cocktail pick and in the glass before straining the drink. Always use an odd number of olives—an even number is bad luck. If adding a twist, strain the drink into the glass, then hold the twist lengthwise just over the glass in the thumb and index finger of each hand and gently fold to express the oils from the peel
  3. Rub the twist on the rim of the glass. Put the twist in the drink.

quick tip

Shaken or stirred?We like to say James Bond ordered his Martini “shaken not stirred,” but that’s the exception to the rule. That’s fine for Mr. Bond, but a Martini is traditionally stirred, creating a silky texture with no air bubbles.


Martini

Professional bartenders like to say, “A Martini is not a cocktail, it’s a conversation.” Most Martini drinkers know exactly how they like their drink made; anything else just isn’t right.
Prep Time 5 mins
Course Drinks
Servings 2

Equipment

  • Martini glass, coupe
  • Cocktail glass (chilled) Mixing glass
  • Bar spoon
  • Strainer

Ingredients
  

  • 2 drops Orange Bitters
  • 1/2 ounce Dry Vermouth
  • 2 1/2 ounce Gin
  • 1 Olives

Instructions
 

  • Put the bitters (if using), vermouth, and gin in a mixing glass with ice. Stir until very cold, about 15 seconds.
  • Strain into the chilled glass. If using olives, put them on a cocktail pick and in the glass before straining the drink. Always use an odd number of olives—an even number is bad luck. If adding a twist, strain the drink into the glass, then hold the twist lengthwise just over the glass in the thumb and index finger of each hand and gently fold to express the oils from the peel
  • Rub the twist on the rim of the glass. Put the twist in the drink.

Notes

Shaken or stirred?
We like to say James Bond ordered his Martini “shaken not stirred,” but that’s the exception to the rule. That’s fine for Mr. Bond, but a Martini is traditionally stirred, creating a silky texture with no air bubbles