Top 5 Protein for the summer

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”on” comments=”on” featured_image=”on” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” border_radii=”on|10px|10px|10px|10px” box_shadow_style=”preset1″ /][et_pb_accordion _builder_version=”3.0.106″ toggle_text_align=”center” border_radii=”on|10px|10px|10px|10px” box_shadow_style=”preset1″ animation_style=”fade” text_shadow_vertical_length=”0.1em” text_shadow_blur_strength=”0.1em” open_toggle_text_color=”#0c71c3″ toggle_level=”h1″ toggle_text_shadow_style=”preset1″ open_toggle_background_color=”#ffffff” toggle_font_size=”24″][et_pb_accordion_item _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”1.Egg” use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” text_shadow_style=”none” box_shadow_style=”none” text_shadow_horizontal_length=”0em” text_shadow_vertical_length=”0em” text_shadow_blur_strength=”0em” border_radii=”on|0px|0px|0px|0px”]

Let’s start off with the grandfather of protein. The Egg, its round small and packs a lot of protein punch. You cook boil it, steam it, fry it, or scramble it. And if you a really hard core you can eat it raw, ( not recommended) .

A single hard-boiled egg contains 6-grams of protein, 5-grams of healthy fats, along with vitamins A, B5, B12, B2, B6, D, E, K, calcium, zinc, phosphorus, and selenium. Hard to find another food that has this much nutritional value… although the yolks are high in cholesterol.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”2. Avocado” use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” text_shadow_style=”none” box_shadow_style=”none” text_shadow_horizontal_length=”0em” text_shadow_vertical_length=”0em” text_shadow_blur_strength=”0em” border_radii=”on|0px|0px|0px|0px”]

The next might be the trendiest food in the past 10 year the Avocado.  Avocado toast is still the hottest item on the menu at a fancy brunch spot. We rep hard for the avocado and its very healthy content – including the fact it’s 2-percent protein. It’s also low in sugars (glucose and fructose) compared to other fruits, as well as being a good source of fiber and healthy fats (mainly something called oleic acid) which many nutritionist claim may help protect against heart disease, diabetes and even cancer.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”3.Meat” use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” text_shadow_style=”none” border_radii=”on|0px|0px|0px|0px” box_shadow_style=”none”]

The most traditional form of proteins is the white meat of chicken or turkey is a source of “excellent, lean protein, this doesn’t mean the delicious dark meat of these birds aren’t delivering the goods it just means dark meat has a little fat and a lot more taste.

How much protein does a chicken breast have, for example? Sources pin it at around 31-grams per 100-grams of meat.

Now you ask should I keep the skin on or off. To get the maximum healthy affect than yes you should take the Skin off.  The skin of chicken and turkey is loaded with saturated fat, which is not one of the “good” fats.  But if you are a regular person just wanting to up your protein than don’t remove the skin before cooking. Oh and it’s not just the bird that can deliver the goods when it comes to protein beef, lamb and pork are also very good sources of Protein. So let’s fire up the BBQ and start eating healthy.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”4.Edamame” use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” text_shadow_style=”none” border_radii=”on|0px|0px|0px|0px” box_shadow_style=”none”]

Edamame is my favorite appetizer whenever I go to a Japanese restaurant. Unlike some other plant-based proteins, this little guy contains all 9-essential amino acids, and is called the “complete protein” by the health food professionals
This little green bean is ideal if you’re a vegetarian looking to pack some protein back into your diet. It’s also cholesterol free and is low in saturated fat, while being high in dietary fiber and Vitamin C.? So ya this guy is a Rock Star in the protein world.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item _builder_version=”3.0.106″ title=”5.Quinoa” use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” text_shadow_style=”none” border_radii=”on|0px|0px|0px|0px” box_shadow_style=”none” text_shadow_horizontal_length=”0em” text_shadow_vertical_length=”0em” text_shadow_blur_strength=”0em”]

The last one on the list is my boy Quinoa this grain has been rising on the trendy list. Technically this guys is classified as seed but is often it is used in place of rice. It packs a whopping 8-grams of protein per 1-cup serving.
It says that as far as whole grains are concerned, quinoa “is a rarity in that it contains a full arsenal of essential amino acids, meaning that it’s a complete protein with muscle-building potential.” You can enhance its flavor by toasting it in a dry skillet before simmering in water, it adds. I also love to add this guy to a salad to give it more heartiness.

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