Tamari Grilled Steak with Sesame Potatoes & Snow Peas

by | Jan 16, 2019 | beef, recipes | 0 comments

Garlic-Tamari Grilled Steak with Sesame Potatoes & Snow Peas

A tasty garlic and tamari marinade penetrates a juicy steak, with a caramelized flavor boost from a fire hot grill. The accompanying potato salad combines russet potatoes, thin, crunchy strips of steamed snow peas, scallions, with toasted sesame seeds.

Tamari Grilled Steak recipe

The key to this meal is tamari sauce, a Japanese sauce made of fermented soybeans. It is thicker and has a more balanced flavor than Chinese soy sauce, making it a good choice for a dipping sauce and marinade. Tamari is often made without wheat, while soy sauce usually contains wheat.

TAMARI HISTORY

In ancient times, tamari was considered simply a dark liquid that pooled on the surface of fermenting miso. Although tamari dates back to eighth-century Japan, it, in fact, may have originated in China, B.C. By 1290, the first commercial tamari shop was established in Japan.

Tamari Grilled Steak recipe

Over time, central Japan became the primary place for the development of tamari because of its ideal climate, choice soybeans, and high-quality water. This was the birth of Japan’s small tamari soy sauce industry, which survives today in the Aichi, Mie, and Gifu districts in the Tokai region of central Japan.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF TAMARI

Miso Tamari is a fermented soy food, so it shares many of miso’s medicinal and nutritional properties while avoiding the issues with unfermented soy foods. Scientists have given particular notice to the high concentration of “brown pigment” in tamari because it contains a strong anti-oxidant and anti-cancer properties. Tamari is said to aid in the digestion of grains and vegetables while being rich in several minerals. Tamari does not contain wheat and is an excellent seasoning for those on a wheat free diet.

Tamari Grilled Steak recipe 3

Many health promoting qualities of fermented soy foods are due to the soybean content, tamari is often considered the most healthy variety of soy sauce. Tamari is a flavorful substitute for salt in all types of cooking.

Recipes header

Garlic-Tamari Grilled Steak with Sesame Potatoes & Snow Peas

A tasty garlic and tamari marinade penetrates a juicy steak, with a caramelized flavor boost from a fire hot grill. The accompanying potato salad combines russet potatoes, thin, crunchy strips of steamed snow peas, scallions, with toasted sesame seeds.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 2

Ingredients

  • garlic use 2 large cloves
  • 1 oz tamari
  • 12 oz sirloin steaks
  • 4 oz snow peas
  • 1 lb russet potato
  • 1 oz scallions
  • 1 oz rice vinegar
  • 1 ⁄4 oz sesame seeds
  • coarse kosher salt
  • neutral oil such as vegetable or safflower
  • sugar
  • freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  • Marinate steaks: Finely grate 2 large garlic cloves. In a small baking dish, whisk together garlic and all but 1 teaspoon tamari (save rest for step 5). Pound steaks to an even thickness if necessary, add to marinade and turn to coat, poking steaks with a fork a few times on both sides to help it absorb. Set aside at room temperature to marinate.
  • Cook potatoes: Scrub potatoes, then cut into 1-inch pieces (no need to peel); place in a medium pot with 2 teaspoons salt. Add cold water to cover by 1-inch. Cover, bring to a boil, then cook, uncovered, until potatoes are just tender, 6-8 minutes. Drain well.
  • Steam snow peas: Trim stem ends from snow peas, then thinly slice lengthwise. Return potatoes to pot and cook over medium-high to remove moisture, stirring gently, about 1 minute. Remove from heat, then immediately place snow peas on top to steam. Set aside. Trim ends from scallions, then thinly slice on an angle (about 1⁄2 cup).
  • Cook steaks: Heat a grill or grill pan over high and lightly brush grates with oil. Grill steaks, occasionally brushing with marinade, until browned and caramelized on the outside and pink in the middle, 3-4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Transfer to cutting board; allow to rest for 5 minutes.
  • Dress potato salad: In a large bowl, whisk rice vinegar, remaining tamari, 3 tablespoons oil, 1⁄4 teaspoon sugar, 3⁄4 teaspoon salt, and a few generous grinds pepper. Add potatoes, snow peas, and scallions to dressing and gently toss.
  • Toast sesame & serve: Place sesame seeds in small skillet and toast on medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until golden brown and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Stir into potato salad and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve steak topped with any accumulated juices from cutting board, and with potato salad alongside. Enjoy!